Tripadvisor never lies!

Sail Cayman just had a look at our Tripadvisor page and it made us so proud of our team’s hard work and dedication that we decided to share the highlights of 2014 with you right here. But before we do that it would probably be pertinent to add that Sail Cayman is rated #6 out of 36 activities on Seven Mile Beach and we boast a 99% average of greatness, grooviness, fun, happiness and all round awesomeness!
Right, now for those highlights!

Fall in Love with the Cayman Islands
We had a wonderful time talking about the Islands with Orneil, basking in the sun, cruising through the waves, and sightseeing from the water. We were all left with big grins on our faces and would love to join Orneil again someday!
I cannot recommend a day with Sail Cayman highly enough – just do it.
I’ve been sailing with Neil for nearly 15 years, and have always had a fantastic experience. Neil is as genuine and fun as they come, and always makes sure his guests have a wonderful experience. Hew knows the best spots on the reef, makes sure his guests get plenty of attention at Stingray City, and his rates are among the…
This is our third time sailing with Sail Cayman, and the experience just gets better and better each time! Skipper Neil sailed his beautiful Splendour in the Wind to the Stingray City sandbar to meet and feed the rays, an experience we will never forget! We then snorkelled the magnificent reef and finally sailed the open seas.
We’ve been visiting the Cayman Island for the last 22 years and this years trip was the best. We were highly recommended ahead by the local expats to book Sail Cayman for any excursions to Stingray City, Starfish Beach and Kaibo and get ready for the most relaxing and fun day of the trip. Nelly made us feel at home…
…..He is so attentive and charming.all of the women had a crush on the captain! He remained so professional, even while we were giggling and giving him a bit of a hard time. After the snorkeling, we went to Kaibo for a great lunch. I highly recommend Sail Cayman. There is a reason he has a FIVE STAR RATING on Trip Advisor. It is an incredible experience. Thank you, Captain Neil!
We sailed with Sail Cayman on 12/6/2013. The best day ever! Orneil was our captain on the Splendour in the Wind. Snorkeling was wonderful and Orneil made us feel welcome and was very knowledgeable about Cayman and the sea! We will certainly book again when we return to paradise!
So, dear reader, there you have it! Escape the frigid weather right now! Click here!

Looking Back on the Magic Sail Cayman Moments of 2014

2014 was an exceptional year for Sail Cayman. We met new families and friends, we said hello to returning families, couples and travelling groups, we wiped a tear at a couple of engagements on board, we laughed and giggled with groups who joined us on snorkeling charters to Stingray City and snorkel charters to the barrier reef and starfish beach. Then off course there were the obligatory private charters to Rum Point and Kaibo for world famous Cayman mudslides. Sail Cayman loved every moment of it.

So without further ado!

January

January2 February2 February3 February March March1 march2 April April 2 june OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA June3 June4 July August August2 September May2 May May3 October December Stingray City November December3

And then the Stars came to the Beach

Probably the best thing about a snorkeling charter with Sail Cayman, other than the attentive personal service and a boat all to yourself, family and friends, is the fact that we take you to where YOU want to go. It is with this in mind that Sail Cayman would like to suggest Starfish Beach as one of your stops during your boat charter.

Starfish Beach is one of those magic places that even Cayman Islands residents keep going back to on lazy Saturdays and Sundays. Easter weekend, the only time when camping is actually legal in Cayman, finds beach and nature lovers camping at Starfish Beach. The rest of the year this pristine sandy peninsula of white beach provides a quiet and peaceful place and the ideal Caribbean getaway with oodles of paradise charm.

How do you get to Starfish Beach? Well that’s easy as it’s only a 15 minute boat ride with Sail Cayman’s speedy power boats, Lazy Daz and The RIB. Our luxury yachts, Nauti Gal and Splendour In The Wind will get you there by chilled out wind power and anchor just offshore in order to protect their keels. Lazy Daz and the RIB can beach in knee deep water from where you can wade to shore, frosty in hand.

Crystal clear water, palm trees swaying in the wind, a sunny and soft sandy beach, what more could you want…maybe just some sunblock Sail Cayman would suggest, we bring the rest!

Starfish Point (1) Starfish Point (3) IMG_4190 IMG_1088 IMG_1107

What you Need to Know about Lionfish and How You Can Help

This article was published in the New York Times and because the threat of the ever growing evasive lionfish species become more prominent throughout the Caribbean we here at Sail Cayman felt it was imperative to share. Orneil, one of our Sail Cayman Captains is an avid lionfish hunter who participates in regular lionfish hunts throughout the Cayman Islands. So when you do come visit us in the Cayman Islands and when you do see lionfish on the menu, please order it, eat it and enjoy it and know that you are doing your share to make a difference.

MIAMI — They eat anything that fits in their mouths. They reproduce copiously and adapt effortlessly. And they have become as ubiquitous and pesky as rats — only prettier and more conniving.

Nearly three decades after a lone venomous lionfish was spotted in the ocean off Broward County — posing as a bit of eye candy back then and nothing more — the species has invaded the Southern seaboard, staking a particular claim on Florida, as well as the Gulf Coast, the Caribbean, and even parts of South America. Spreading gradually at first, and then frenetically from 2005 onward, lionfish have become the most numerous marine nonnative invasive species in the world, scientists said. Along the way, the predators, which hail from the other side of the world and can grow here to 20 inches long, are wreaking havoc on delicate reefs and probably further depleting precious snapper and grouper stocks.

There is no stopping them now, salt-water experts said. But hoping to at least slow them down, marine biologists and government agencies have been intensifying efforts recently to spearfish them out of certain areas that harbor fragile reefs and figure out how they became a threat so quickly and so successfully in the Atlantic Ocean.

Most recently, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission voted in June to ban as of Aug. 1 the importation of lionfish, and this month to prohibit the breeding of the fish in the state, steps that marine experts said will serve to focus attention on the severity of the problem. The commission had already lifted fishing licensing requirements to hunt lionfish and even started an app so that people can report lionfish sightings.

“Eradication is not on the table, but local control has proven to be very effective,” said Lad Akins, special projects director for the Reef Environmental Education Foundation, a grass-roots organization helping to curb the proliferation of lionfish. “They are what many people call a near-perfect invader.”

Figuring out how to combat them —what works, what does not — has been an exercise in both imagination and frustration. The lionfish derbies, or rodeos, seem to have the best success rate. Groups of divers gather for a day of spearfishing; last week, 22 divers, some from as far away as Texas, strapped on tanks in the Florida Keys and speared 573 lionfish in one day. There is talk of offering bounties, as one university in Mississippi did to create incentives, but money is scarce.

Then there is the gourmet approach. Some Florida restaurants are now buying lionfish, which are light and flaky when cooked, not unlike snapper, and serving them to diners. Once there is a large enough market for them, scientists said, fishermen will pay attention and help haul them out of the sea.

But there are problems there, too.

“The tricky part is catching them — traditional fisheries use hook and line and that doesn’t seem to be effective with lionfish,” said Maia McGuire, a marine biologist at the University of Florida. “Divers with spear guns, they catch and catch and catch; it’s labor intensive and requires divers, gear and boats.”

Being as wily as they are, lionfish do not typically swim in schools, making them difficult to sweep up with traditional fishing nets. And they have somehow adapted to deep waters — a submarine found some of them 1,000 feet below the surface of the sea, which is too deep for divers.

Traps offer some hope, scientists said; lobster fishermen in the Keys have noticed lionfish in their traps. Work is underway to build traps just for lionfish, which would make it easier for fishermen to catch and sell them.

Scientists are also finding some comfort in the fact that merely limiting the number of lionfish on a reef — as opposed to culling them all — will allow the reef and its fish to recover, said Stephanie Green, a marine ecologist at Oregon State University who is conducting a study of such efforts.

Lionfish do not belong in the Atlantic Ocean. They wound up there when people bought them to glam up their aquariums and eventually freed them in the ocean, probably thinking they were doing a good deed, scientists said. Their true home is the Pacific and Indian Oceans, where they do not pose a problem, most likely because they are eaten by more powerful predators that keep the population in check. Here, the predators seemed befuddled by them. They either steer clear or are enticed a little too close by their orange-stripe colors and Lady Gaga-like appearance.

“Our native species don’t know who they are,” said Matthew Johnston, a research scientist at Nova Southeastern University in Florida. “I’ve seen pictures of juvenile fish trying to hide within their tentacles. They think they are shelters — and then they just eat them. It’s a pretty bad deal.”

And eat they do. Mr. Johnston described lionfish as gluttonous, because studies have shown that they can stuff 50 or 60 baby fish into their stomachs. They even have big layers of stomach fat, the result of so much overindulgence, he added. But, as committed survivalists, they also can make do without food for long spells.

There is little likelihood of extinction. When one dies, gazillions more take their place. Female lionfish are built for spawning; they each release two million eggs a year. By the time scientists here sorted all this out, their numbers were headed toward infinity.

“They can spawn as frequently as every four days, which is really crazy,” Ms. McGuire said, then wondered, “Are we going to end up with reefs just covered with lionfish?”